Pathway Genomics announced that world-renowned geneticist George Church, Ph.D., has joined its scientific advisory board. He is the founder of the Personal Genome Project, a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, and director of the Harvard NHGRI Center of Excellence in Genomic Science.

Dr. Church is the founder of the Personal Genome Project, a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, and director of the Harvard NHGRI Center of Excellence in Genomic Science.

“Dr. Church is widely recognized as a pioneer of invention and innovation in the field of genomics,” said David Becker, Ph.D., Pathway Genomics’ chief scientific officer. “Our collaboration with him will ensure Pathway’s continued success as the leader in providing cutting-edge genetic tests and personalized patient information to physicians around the world.”

“Dr. Church is widely recognized as a pioneer of invention and innovation in the field of genomics,” said David Becker, Ph.D., Pathway Genomics’ chief scientific officer. “Our collaboration with him will ensure Pathway’s continued success as the leader in providing cutting-edge genetic tests and personalized patient information to physicians around the world.”

Dr. Church, with Walter Gilbert, Ph.D., invented the first direct genomic sequencing method in 1984, along with broadly-applied concepts of molecular multiplexing and tags, homologous recombination methods, and array DNA synthesizers.

“Providing actionable genetic information to physicians personalizes the clinical experience for patients,” said Dr. Church. “As a leading clinical laboratory, Pathway is a testament to clinical innovation and is helping to advance the field of medicine through genomics.”

“Providing actionable genetic information to physicians personalizes the clinical experience for patients,” said Dr. Church. “As a leading clinical laboratory, Pathway is a testament to clinical innovation and is helping to advance the field of medicine through genomics.”

In use from 1975 to 2005, Dr. Church’s 3-D software led to automated sequencing and the first commercial genome sequence (pathogen, H. pylori in 1994). He has served in advisory roles for leading journals, and his current research focuses on integrating biosystems-modeling with personal genomics and synthetic biology. He is a Franklin Laureate for Achievement in Science and a member of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering.

Pathway Genomics’ scientific advisory board consists of 14 leaders in various fields including oncology, pharmacogenomics, endocrinology, bioinformatics, biostatistics, behavioral genetics, nutrigenomics, and human epigenetics. To view the company’s full scientific advisory board, visit www.pathway.com.

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